Job Search Advice to be Weary of

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By: Jill Thompson

Being in a job search can be a long and winding road. It can be overwhelming to think about how to start the process. Thoughts that might be going through your mind are this: How do I start? What do I even like to do? I haven’t written a resume in 10 years. In addition to the million thoughts running through your head, you also may be getting advice from everyone you know. If you’re working with a career transition coach, you’re likely receiving all the best information. But if you’re out there on your own, sometimes there’s bad advice floating around. Here are FIVE things that just don’t hold true in 2016.

Cover letters are a thing of the past: Cover letters are still a critical tool in the job search. Online job listings may make it seem like they’re obsolete, but a well written cover letter is still valuable. Customize each one toward the specific job, keep it short and easy to read and highlight why you’re the best one for the job.

Your resume should list every job you’ve ever had: Your resume is a marketing document and should be concise and tailored to a specific job opening. Your resume should be reflective of your accomplishments and successes as opposed to a history of employment.

Accept any job that’s offered: This can be an easy trap to fall into when you are unemployed and concerned about a gap on your resume. Employers are more interested in the skills and fit you bring to them, rather than any gap that might occur. Carefully evaluate all aspects of the new job before you accept. Taking the wrong job will not lead to success. It’s especially hard to focus on another job search once you’ve started a new job- no matter how much you think you can do both.

Friends, family and former colleagues are your best resource for networking: While they valuable people to keep in touch with during a job search, often times their connections may overlap with yours. Take the time to cultivate more distant connections- you’re more likely to learn about opportunities you wouldn’t have previously discovered.

Don’t look for a job around the holidays: It’s not always true that companies don’t hire in November or December. If there’s an opening, they’ll need to fill it quickly – and you’ll want to be prepared when you get the call for the interview.

What’s the worst piece of advice you’ve ever heard? We’d love to hear your feedback.

 

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